Chapter Three - 
A Short History of the Carvings 


Goosey Marlin, Spring 2015

  

This piece is guided by a comparative reading of pre-Columbian Mesoamerican and Andean interpretations regarding the intricate relationship between the arc of the horizon and the movement of light as well as complimentary Eurasian insights regarding physical balance and a “cosmic egg,” as exemplified by the goose’s egg found on one side of the piece. When gently nudged in either direction Goosey will neatly spin while too much force will cause it to fall over. Meanwhile, close examination of the of the egg reveals that it follows the universal notion of “X” for charting and the movement of light in a way that can be compared to Northern knowledge of the four Cardinal Directions and the Medicine Wheel, as found in the different interpretion of the Cree Elder Francis Whiskeyjack. The rock for Goosey Marlin was quarried from the environs of Cadomin, Alberta and, sadly, the carving smashed during one photo session journey in Beijing. Two Chinese replacement rocks were given to the Homeglen School of One.


Scorched Bolivarian Wave Reader, Winter 2015

  

This carving is inspired by a comparative reading of pre-Columbian Mesoamerican and Andean interpretations regarding the intricate relationship between the arc of the horizon, the movement of light and complimentary insights into the similarities between spiraling waves of water, sound and light. The diamonds defining the eyes and the face of the carving also recall representations of stars as diamonds. When gently nudged in either direction the will neatly rotate or rock while too much force will produce an unhappy result. The rock for the Wave Reader was quarried from the area of the Carcross Desert, Yukon in Winter 2015 by A.J., a Canadian citizen from Antioquia, Colombia. The Scorched Bolivarian Wave Reader immediately was moved to Montreal following its return to Canada, where it awaits future journeys.


Yukon Pepper Squall, Spring 2015

  

This piece is guided by a comparative reading of pre-Columbian Mesoamerican interpretations regarding “spirals” of light, water, and wind as well as complimentary Eurasian insights regarding physical balance and a “cosmic egg.” When gently nudged in either direction the Yukon Squall will neatly float. The spiraling fissures of the carving help channel light according to the persistent twilight and snow storms of a Northern Winter, hence explaining why the piece is best viewed at an angle. The rock for Yukon Pepper was quarried from the Yukon River in the environs of Whitehorse during the Winter months 2015 by A.J., a Canadian citizen from Antioquia, Colombia. The Scorched Bolivarian Wave Reader immediately was moved to Montreal following its return to Canada, where it awaits future journeys.


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Peanut Fish Canoe Carries Important Cargo, Spring 2015

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Consistent with other canoe carvings, this piece is guided by a comparative reading of pre-Columbian Mesoamerican and Andean interpretations regarding the intricate relationship between the arc of the horizon and the movement of light as well as complimentary Eurasian insights regarding physical balance and a “cosmic egg.” When gently nudged in either direction the Peanut Fish Canoe will neatly spin with its precious treasure on its back while too much force will produce an unhappy result. The rock for the Canoe was also quarried from the environs of Cadomin Alberta, while subsequent to its travels to China, the piece has gone through many rock sails made of jade until a suitable and durable Edmonton River Valley companion stone was found, ironically, during a walk near the famous Chinese gate in Edmonton. The canoe carving was last seen by the School of One on the Pacific Coast within the environs of Vancouver where, hopefully, it continues to inform cognitive journeys.


Fractured Bookworm, Winter 2015

This piece is guided by a comparative reading of pre-Columbian Mesoamerican interpretations regarding “cosmic bundling and stacking” as well as complimentary Eurasian insights regarding physical balance and a “cosmic egg.” When gently nudged in either direction the Bookworm will neatly spin while too much force will produce an unhappy result. The natural fractures found on faces and sides with the defining layered fissures of the carving tend to recall the cascade of light in Edmonton’s river valley during Summer twilight. The rock for the Fractured was quarried from the banks of the North Saskatchewan River in late August. Prior to its journey to China, the Fractured Bookworm was used by one group of University of Alberta students for the Culture, Power and Urban Space gallery. Following its return to Edmonton, the Fractured Bookworm was presented to WT, a principal of a small, rural school located just outside of Medicine Hat Alberta.


Aerial Diamondhead, Winter 2015

  

This piece, which was given in friendship to LK as a gift in anticipation of future travels and in recognition of LK’s extraordinary pedagogical prowess, draws upon the Mesoamerican representation of diamonds as “suns” or “star” as seen in the carvings “head” and “eyes”. When gently nudged in either direction will neatly spin when placed “vertically” in at least two positions, while too much force will cause it to fall over. The rock for Aerial Diamondhead was quarried from the environs of Cadomin, Alberta and the fissured contours of the piece recall the geometric shadows cast upon the Western flank of the Canadian Rockies during the late Summer. In addition to journey to the Beijing Park found in Chapter 2, Aerial Diamondhead was carefully secured during the Asian travels of LK after China and before returning to Edmonton.