Norman Wells - the Carvings 


Yorkino Fish Boat and Habanero Sail Marlin, Spring 2015

  

Consistent with other fish canoe carvings, these two pieces are guided by a comparative reading of pre-Columbian Mesoamerican and Andean interpretations regarding the intricate relationship between the arc of the horizon and the movement of light as well as complimentary Eurasian insights regarding physical balance and “cosmic bundling”. When gently nudged in either direction the Yorkino Fish Canoe will neatly rotate with the Habanero Sail Marlin on its back while too much force will produce an unhappy result. The rock for the Canoe was quarried from the area of Kinbasket Lake, BC, in late August, just when the salmon complete their migration towards the Rockies. Meanwhile the Habanero Sail Marlin was given to the School of One by the ever-enterprising retired rock merchant known as Asad. In subsequent collaborations the Yorkino Fish Boat and Habenero Sail Marlin travelled to Ireland, Portugal, the Caribbean, Alberta and throughout Sahtu territory.


Rossdale Wood Buffalo, Spring 2015

This piece is also guided by a comparative reading of extant pre-Columbian Mesoamerican and Andean interpretations regarding the intricate relationship between the arc of the horizon and the movement of light as well as complimentary Eurasian insights regarding physical balance and “cosmic bundling”, further exemplified by the fissures channeling light on the carving’s side. The rock for the Rossdale Wood Buffalo was found in the area of Kinbasket Lake, BC, in late August, just when the salmon complete their migration towards the Rockies while the carving was completed in the calming shade of one of the largest Winnipeg Maple trees in Western Canada, ever. Rossdale Wood Buffalo returned to Edmonton where it accompanied at least two Golden Bears on a "creative destruction" journey in Edmonton’s River Valley shortly after the Autumnal Equinox.

Norman Wells Travel Account D2

Mackenzie Fish Canoe with Jaded Sail Burden Spring 2015

Norman Wells Travel Account D3

These two pieces were fashioned during the nascent stages of the School of One's Worldwide Waterways advanced research and "public pedagogoy" agenda. The pieces readily embrace extant Eurasian insights regarding physical balance and a “cosmic egg.” When gently nudged in either direction the Mackenzie Fish Canoe will neatly spin with the Jaded Sail Marlin on its back while too much force will produce an unhappy result. The rock for the Canoe also originated from the area of Kinbasket Lake, BC. Meanwhile, the Sail was given to the School of One by the ever-enterprising retired rock merchant known as Asad. The Mackenzie Fish Canoe and its Jaded Sail Burden returned to Edmonton after its journeys in Norman Wells where it accompanied enthusiastic History students throughout the Edmonton River Valley in their quest to learn more about the city’s bridges during a "creative destruction" exercise.


Ice Cube Fish Canoe Carries Important Cargo, Spring 2015

Consistent with other canoe carvings, this piece is was developed through a comparative reading of extant records and was also conceived as a means of "remembering" local environments and personal spaces during cognitive "global journeys". When gently nudged in either direction the Ice Cube Fish Canoe will neatly spin with its precious treasure on its back while too much force will produce an unhappy result. The rock for the Canoe remains obscure and since it is too big to be caught in a shoe while too small to trip over, it probably was found during an absent-minded Saturday-afternoon journey in and around the greater Edmonton area. Ice Cube Canoe went to Ireland after Norman Wells and, per the request of the School of One carver, was left in at a famous Dublin pub and eatery, betwixt the salt and pepper shakers found on the table at breakfast.

  

Hibernation Pescador, Spring 2015

  

This piece is guided by a comparative reading of pre-Columbian Mesoamerican and Andean interpretations regarding the intricate relationship between the arc of the horizon and the movement of light as well as complimentary Eurasian insights regarding physical balance and a “cosmic egg.” When gently nudged in either direction Hibernation Pescador will neatly rotate or gently rock while too much force will produce an unhappy result. The carving, which includes the School of One’s original motif for the “face of light”, follows a weary Northern sun seeking the well-earned rest offered by the onset of Winter, also suggested by the “snow flakes” following the fissures channeling light on the carving’s sides. The rock for this work originated from the area of Kinbasket Lake, BC, in late August, just when the salmon complete their migration towards the Rockies. Hibernation Pescador returned to Edmonton, only to be put to work again in a History class where hibernation is always possible and easily achieved.


Wave Reader, Winter 2015

This carving is inspired by a comparative reading of extant multicultural records which suggested ancient knowledge (scientia) into the movement of light and complimentary insights into the similarities between spiraling waves of water, sound and light. Like the the Nested Rossdale Seraph, the Wave Reader was a careful companion during the creation of the Culture, Power and Urban Space gallery. And like the Nested Rossdale Seraph, the piece went on a canoe ride up the Mackenzie and, thus, it remains with a new travel companion who frequents the area in around the banks of the Mackenzie River where it will also remember collaborative voyages of discovery, past, present and future.

  

Rossdale Volador, Winter 2015

Norman Wells Travel Account D6
 

This rock was found near Kinbasket Lake, BC, in late August, just when the salmon complete their migration towards the Rockies. The carving sports an natural egg-like features on its base and, thus, once again conjured memories of extant Eurasian narratives regarding "cosmic balance" and a maternal Earth. The Rossdale Volador eventually split into two pieces following it’s summer expedition to Norman Wells, a likely consequence of the lengthy, previous service for the creation of the Culture, Power and Urban Space gallery during the Winter.


Ms. Hoody Stacks, Winter 2015

This piece is guided a comparative reading of pre-Columbian Mesoamerican and Andean interpretations regarding the movement of light and associate observations regarding the spectrum, Byzantine notions regarding “layering,” as well as complimentary Eurasian insights regarding physical balance and a “cosmic egg.” The carving also considers Mesoamerican notions of diamonds as stars or pyramids. The School of One’s original hexagonal motif, “the face of light” defining the front of the work seems to recall the journey of the sun to its temporary resting place in the Rockies before it always begins its daily Pacific journey towards the Asian morning. When gently nudged in either direction, Ms. Hoody Stacks will neatly rotate while too much force will produce an unhappy result. The rock for Ms. Stacks was quarried from in and around the environs of the Low Level Bridge, Edmonton. The carving is dedicated to the inspirational past, present and future academic achievements of students from the Northwest Territories, Canada and is a careful companion found in the Travel Accounts entitled “The Memory Palace of Hoody Stacks.”

Norman Wells Travel Account D7

Nested Rossdale Seraph, Winter 2015

Norman Wells Travel Account D8

When gently nudged in either direction the Rossdale Seraph will neatly spin while too much force will produce an unhappy result. Meanwhile, the carving marshals Mesoamerican concepts of stars to help define the distinctly Albertan hexagonal “face of light” found on its front. The rock for the Seraph was quarried from the region of Kinbasket Lake, BC, in late August. As noted elsewhere, the Nested Rossdale Seraph was a careful companion during the creation of the Culture, Power and Urban Space gallery. The piece went on a canoe ride up the Mackenzie and, thus, did not make it back in time to return to Edmonton for the Winter. It now quietly in and around the environs of Norman Wells, NWT.